Indonesian Tuna
Fishery Improvement Project

Archive Date: March 2014
 

The Indonesian Tuna FIP was transitioned from SFP to PT Intimas Surya in March 2014. The following FIP report reflects the status of the FIP at the time of transition. The current FIP public report can be found on the Fishery Improvement Indonesia website, here


Species: 
 
yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares)
bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus)
albacore (Thunnus alalunga)
 

FIP Scope/Scale: Fishery level

Fishery Location: Indonesia EEZ, Indian Ocean

For map see: 

Stock
Stock Link
Yellowfin tuna – Indian Ocean
Bigeye tuna – Indian Ocean
Albacore – Indian Ocean
 

FIP Participants:

FIP Stakeholders:

Sustainability Information:

Stock
Jurisdiction
Fishery link
Yellowfin tuna – Indian Ocean
Indonesia & IOTC
Bigeye tuna – Indian Ocean
Indonesia & IOTC
 
 
Albacore – Indian Ocean
Indonesia & IOTC
 

For sustainability information of these fisheries please click here.

Date Publicly Announced: January 2012

FIP Stage: 4, FIP is delivering improvement in policies or practices
 

Current Improvement Recommendations:
  • Promote traceability to ensure that the origins and status of tuna products purchased are well-known and all coming from legal fisheries
  • Improve the availability of accurate data on catches and bycatch
  • Improve the management and policy to support sustainable management of the tuna fisheries. 
Background:
 
Indonesia is the biggest tuna-producing country in the world, contributing 15 percent of global tuna production in 2009, followed by the Philippines, China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Spain (FISHSTAT-FAO 2010).  However, in terms of export, Indonesia only contributes about 4 percent of total global tuna export for fresh, frozen, and canned tuna (Globefish 2010).
 
Yellowfin tuna accounts for 29 percent of total commercial tuna landings in Indonesia, while bigeye tuna accounts for 7 percent (MMAF 2010). The fishing grounds for Indonesian tuna fall under two convention areas, Indian Ocean and Western Central Pacific Ocean.  The Western Central Pacific Ocean currently supports the largest industrial tuna fishery in Indonesia, contributing almost 80 percent of total Indonesian commercial tuna production, while Eastern Indian Ocean contributes 20 percent of total commercial tuna catch from Indonesia (FISHSTAT-FAO 2010). Main fishing gears for the tuna fishery in Indonesia are longliner, traditional hook and line, and purse-seiner combined with FADs (fish aggregation devices).
 
Indonesia joined the Indian Ocean Tuna Convention (IOTC) in 2007 and just recently achieved full member status in the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in 2013.
 
The main challenges to this fishery include:
  • Inaccurate, incomplete, and inconsistent catch data reporting
  • No data on the artisanal tuna fisheries - the current available annual catch data of tuna fisheries from Indonesia is collected from larger vessels
  • The existing annual catch data from capture fisheries statistics for Indonesia do not show the annual catch estimate for each species for each fishing gears.  Retained and bycatch data is limited or not available.
Market for Indonesian tuna

Tuna products are the second biggest Indonesian fishery product exports, contributing 15 percent of total export value or about USD 498.6 million in 2011. The main markets for tuna export from Indonesia are Japan (35%), the United States (20%), Thailand (12%), European Union countries (9%), and Saudi Arabia (6%) (MMAF 2012).
Indonesia is also the biggest fresh and frozen tuna supplier to the US, contributing about 27 percent (or about 13 thousand tonnes) of total US fresh and frozen tuna import in 2010, valued at USD 112 million (NMFS 2011).  Indonesia was the leader of tuna supplying countries to Japan (mainly yellowfin and bigeye), supplying about 20 thousand tonnes per year of tuna to Japan’s market.  Indonesia only contributes about 2 percent of total canned tuna import to the EU market, amounting to 9,800 tonnes in 2008.
 
FIP Objectives:
  • Promote traceability to ensure that the origins and status of tuna products purchased are well-known and all coming from legal fisheries by engaging the supply chains
  • Improve the availability of accurate data on catches, retained and bycatch
  • Collaborate with other NGOs working on tuna fisheries issues in the country, including working together to improve the management and policy towards sustainable fisheries
This FIP involves approximately 28 tuna longliners operating in the Indian Ocean and Indonesia EEZ (circa 10% of total Indonesian longliners operating in the Indian Ocean). So the objectives fall into two phases:
  • Phase 1: To establish a demonstration project showing how improvements could be achieved in tuna longline fisheries.
     
  • Phase 2: To use the output of this FIP as lessons learned for a broader range of tuna stakeholders (i.e., tuna associations) and expand the participation of the project.
Progress Update:

2010
  • First meeting between SFP and Indonesian Tuna Longline Association (ATLI) and Indonesian Tuna Association (ASTUIN) took place in April to identify key fisheries issues. Throughout 2010, dialogue initiated with WWF, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF), and individual members of the tuna associations to engage, support, and develop the FIP. 
2011
  • Meetings held between SFP and Amacore (tuna buyers in Netherlands) and PT Intimas Surya (a tuna longline company managing 28 longliners and one of the major tuna processors and exporters in Indonesia) to engage in the FIP.  Later on, other companies, Cannon Fish (US-based tuna importer) and Open Seas (Netherlands-based tuna importers) also showed interest in joining this FIP.  
  • Second meeting between SFP and Indonesian Tuna Longline Association (ATLI) and Indonesian Tuna Association (ASTUIN) was held in September to update on FIP progress and agree on further advancements; development of a white paper and workplan.

2012

  • In January, FIP participants (PT Intimas Surya, Amacore, Cannon Fish, and Open Seas) approved and signed the FIP agreement and discussed and approved the FIP workplan and budget. Implementation of the FIP workplan started in February 2012.  A FIP meeting was held during the Brussels seafood show in April, attended by three FIP members and SFP staff to discuss the progress of FIP implementation.
     
  • FIP participants (represented by PT Intimas Surya) and SFP had a meeting with a government researcher from the Indonesian Research Institute of Tuna Fisheries (Loka Tuna Benoa), who is responsible for the tuna longline onboard observer program for Indian Ocean tuna, to discuss data reporting training for vessels’ crews and the onboard observer program (e.g., methodology and training materials). The Fisheries Research Department suggested that FIP participants use research observers from the government to train crews in data reporting. An MOU between Indonesian Research Institute of Tuna Fisheries and FIP member PT Intimas Surya was signed to implement an onboard observer program from March 2012 to 31 December 2012.
     
  • In March, PT Intimas Surya appointed the fresh tuna vessel KM Mutiara 09 as the first to receive training. Data recording training started on shore for PT Intimas Surya staff to understand the data required.  The onboard training and onboard observer process to collect scientific data and information commenced in May and continued for 49 days. The data was then analyzed by the Indonesian Research Institute of Tuna Fisheries.
     
  • In July, the second observer spent 84 days at sea (17 April to 9 July 2012), consisting of 54 days on board Mutiara 05 (a tuna longline vessel) and 30 days on board KM Hiroyoshi (a collecting boat, which brought the observer back to base). The vessel’s fishing ground is in the high seas, West of Australia, a 10-day sea journey from Benoa Harbour. The third observer was onboard in September.
     
  • FIP meeting was conducted on 12 October to update progress on the implementation. The meeting was held in Jakarta and hosted by the office of the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries. Meeting attendees included the Indonesian Tuna Association (ASTUIN), Indonesian Tuna Longline Association (ATLI), members of Indonesian tuna and snapper FIPs, Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries staff, and SFP. The outputs of the meeting were to continue the onboard observer program in 2013 and to continue improving the catch reporting by the fishing vessels.

  • Participants of the FIP met in January in Bali to review the 2012 project implementation and to discuss the plan for 2013. FIP participants’ goals for 2013 included expanding the FIP participant membership, as well as the fisheries (including the coastal handline tuna fishery in the Indian Ocean and the Banda Sea, which is part of the Western Central Pacific Ocean).
     
  • On 20 February 2013, Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) established a Ministerial Regulation regarding Implementation of Observers on Fishing Boats and Collecting Boats of 30 GT (gross tonnes) and above operating within the Indonesian territory and in the high seas. (Permen No.1/PERMEN-KP/2013). The issuance of this MMAF decree now mandates companies to take onboard observers.
  • On April 3, SFP facilitated the third Indonesian tuna supplier roundtable in Jakarta. This meeting was attended by existing tuna FIP participants (PT Intimas Surya), about 10 companies that have expressed interest in this tuna FIP or are already working in the handline yellowfin tuna FIP, a representative from Indonesian Tuna Association (ASTUIN), Indonesian Tuna Longline Association (ATLI), and a government representative (Directorate of Capture Fisheries-MMAF).  This meeting provided a venue for the companies involved in tuna industries to share their interests, lessons learned, and challenges in developing and implementing tuna FIPs in Indonesia. 
     
  • On May 23, SFP facilitated a tuna FIP meeting at ATLI office in Bali. The meeting was attended by FIP participants (PT Intimas Surya, Cannon Fish, and North Atlantic) and some ATLI members, who expressed an interest in learning more about and joining the tuna FIP.
     
  • FIP participants developed a workplan and budget for the tuna FIP for 2013–2014 and initiated a website to start reporting on the Indonesian Tuna FIP and the newly formed industry-led FIPs, including tuna, swordfish, and mahi-mahi (http://fisheriesimprovementindonesia.org/).
    At the regional level, the IOTC (Indian Ocean Tuna Commmission) has adopted the interim target and limit reference points for the species of tuna and tuna-like species, i.e., albacore, bigeye tuna, skipjack, yellowfin tuna, and swordfish (Resolution 13/10). 
     
  • Two observers from Indonesian Research Institute of Tuna Fisheries have been onboard the Indian Ocean longline tuna vessels (KM Permata 103 and KM Pelita Harapan) since mid-August for a total of 122 days.
     
  • The development of a coastal tuna FIP in the Banda and Ceram Seas has started with the identification of the number of fishers that will be involved in the FIP as well as an area fisheries data gap analysis.
  
 2014
 
January – March
 
On 24 February, PT Intimas Surya worked together with Indonesian Tuna Longline Association (ATLI) to faciliate the meeting between ATLI members and Head of Subdirectorate of Monitoring and Evaluation, Directorate General of Capture Fisheries at Ministry of Marind Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) to discuss the implementation of the logbook and observer onboard programs. The meeting was held at the ATLI office and attended by 15 companies (ATLI members). The meeting aimed to raise awareness among ATLI members of the importance of submitting accurate catch data to improve fishery management.  MMAF also welcomed any input from ATLI members to improve government regulation regarding the logbook and observer onboard progams.
 
After the meeting with ATLI, the Head of Subdirectorate of Monitoring and Evaluation, Directorate General of Capture Fisheries of MMAF, reviewed the catch data reporting system submitted by FIP participants. The review process provided a venue for the government to understand the challenges of the captains of the longline vessels in recording their catch data using the current logbook form. The government and FIP participants came into agreement about which improvements could realistically be made in the catch data reporting system to improve data accuracy.
 
FIP participants organized and attended a FIP meeting on March 16, during the Seafood Expo North America in Boston, Participants included: PT. Intimas Surya, Amacore, Open Seas, Cannon Fish, Seafood Exchange, and North Atlantic. The meeting discussed and agreed on a 2014 FIP workplan and FIP budget. The meeting also discussed other issues, including the FIP ownership transition to industry. It was agreed that after March, the FIP would transition to leadership under PT Intimas Surya, including hosting of the public report at http://fisheriesimprovementindonesia.org.
 
On March 17, FIP leader PT Intimas Surya presented the FIP’s progress, lessons learned, and next steps during the Indonesia Fisheries Meeting hosted by MMAF and SFP in Boston at the Seafood Expo North America.
 
 
 
Resources:
 
FISHSTAT-FAO. Capture Production 2010. Fishery Statistics. Food and Agriculture Organization.
 
IOTC. 2010. Report of the Thirteenth Session of the Scientific Committee. Victoria, Seychelles, 6-10 December 2010. Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, Seychelles.
 
MMAF. 2010. Marine and Fisheries Statistics 2008. Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries.
 
MMAF. 2012. Export Statistics of Fishery Products 2011. Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries. 
 
NMFS. 2011. US Foreign Trade. The Fisheries Statistics Division of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).
 
WCPFC. 2009. Stock assessment of yellowfin tuna in the western and central Pacific Ocean. Scientific Committee Fifth Regular Session. SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE FIFTH REGULAR SESSION 10-21 August 2009 Port Vila, Vanuatu.
 

Indonesian Tuna FIP Detailed Information

 
Summary of Fishery Status
 
a.   SFP own estimate, based on data from FishSource
 
Summary of yellowfin tuna status:
Location
Current Status
SFP own estimate, based on data from FishSource:
Indian Ocean
A score of 10.0 was given to current stock status. Biomass is well above MSY reference points and fishing mortality is below MSY level.
Western Central Pacific Ocean
A score of 10.0 was given to current stock status.  Biomass is above MSY reference points and fishing mortality is below MSY level.
 
Summary of bigeye tuna status:
Location
Current Status
SFP own estimate, based on data from FishSource:
Indian Ocean
A score of 8.0 was given to current stock status. Biomass is at MSY reference points and fishing mortality is well below MSY level.
Western Central Pacific Ocean
A score of 8.7 was given to current stock status. Biomass is above MSY reference points but fishing mortality is above MSY level.
 
Summary of albacore status:
Location
Current Status
SFP own estimate, based on data from FishSource:
Indian Ocean
A score of 8.4 was given to current stock status. Biomass is slightly above MSY reference points and fishing mortality is below MSY level.
 
 
b.   Other ranking systems
 
Certain NGO rankings rate yellowfin and bigeye tuna “red” or “avoid.” However, these ratings are at the species level, not stock or fishery level, and consequently default to a lowest common denominator. Advice on an inappropriate resolution often obscures the true status of a fishery.
 
Indian and Pacific Oceans
Ranking System
Current Status
Avoided for both bigeye and yellowfin tuna caught by longline
Avoid for yellowfin and bigeye tuna caught by longline, except for yellowfin tuna caught in Hawaii
Yellow for yellowfin and bigeye tuna caught by longline
 
 
FIP Progress Update:
 
Results/ FIP Stage
Indicator of Success
Scope/ Scale
Specific Details
Date Achieved
List of Suppliers
 
Source
FIP is launched (Stage 1)
Sustainability evaluation is publicly available
Fishery
Market analysis of Indonesian tuna completed
August 2008
N/A
Fishery
Scoping out of Indonesian tuna completed
March 2009
N/A
 
Fishery
Supply chain analysis of Indonesian tuna completed
April 2010
N/A
 
Fishery
Internal strategy for a fisheries improvement project for Indonesian tuna completed
September 2010
N/A
Paper on Internal Strategy for Fisheries Improvement Project for Indonesian Tuna (confidential)
Fishery
Sustainability information made available on FishSource
June 2011
N/A
Fisheries improvement recommendations publicly available
 
 
Fishery
Recommendations drafted as part of fishery white paper, reviewed by FIP participants
October 2011
PT Intimas Surya
FIP is formed (Stage 2)
Suppliers are organized
Fishery
Several meetings with FIP participants conducted
April and September 2011
ASTUIN, ATLI, PT Intimas Surya
 
FIP workplan discussed with PT Intimas Surya and Amacore (buyer)
October 2011
PT Intimas Surya
Amacore
 
FIP agreement approved and signed by all FIP participants
January 2012
PT Intimas Surya, Amacore, Open Seas and Cannon Fish
FIP agreement
 
 
 Fishery
FIP meeting was held during Brussels seafood show, attended by 3 FIP members and SFP staff to discuss progress of FIP implementation.
April 2012
Amacore, Open Seas, and Cannon Fish
 
FIP is encouraging improvements (Stage 3)
Workplan with annual improvement milestones is publicly available
Fishery
Workplan is available
March 2012
PT Intimas Surya, Amacore, Open Seas, and Cannon Fish
 
 
Fishery
FIP participants met in Bali to review the project implementation in 2012 and to discuss the plan for 2013.
January 2013
PT Intimas Surya
2013 Workplan
 
Fishery
FIP participants met in Boston to review the FIP workplan and budget
March 2014
PT Intimas Surya, Amacore, Open Seas, Cannon Fish, Seafood Exchange, and North Atlantic
2014 FIP Workplan
 
Detailed FIP Workplan
Suppliers are engaging regulators
Fishery
FIP collaborated with Indonesian Research Institute of Tuna Fisheries (under MMAF) Communication with Indonesian Research Institute of Tuna Fisheries regarding the design and implementation of data reporting and onboard observer program
February 2012
PT Intimas Surya
Meeting notes
 
 
Fishery
Data recording introduction for PT Intimas Surya staff conducted; onboard data recording and onboard observer to start second week of March
March 2012
PT Intimas Surya
Letter of duty (in Bahasa)
 
 
 Fishery
Observer program commenced to collect scientific data and information (two fishing vessels, total 133 days).
May 2012
PT Intimas Surya and Research Institute for Tuna Fisheries
Observer reports (Catch Data)
 
 
 Fishery
FIP meeting facilitated by Directorate of Fish Resources, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries
October 2012
PT Intimas Surya
Meeting notes
 
 
 Fishery
SFP facilitated the third Indonesian tuna supplier roundtable.
April 2013
PT Intimas Surya, other 10 companies in tuna industries, ASTUIN, ATLI, MMAF
 
 
Fishery
SFP facilitated tuna FIP meeting on 23 May at ATLI office, also inviting some ATLI members.
May 2013
PT Intimas Surya, Cannon Fish, North Atlantic, and some ATLI members
Meeting Note
 
 
 
 
Fishery
FIP members initiated a website to start reporting on the Indonesian Tuna FIP and the newly formed industry-led FIPs, including tuna, swordfish, and mahi-mahi
June 2013
PT Intimas Surya and North Atlantic
 
 
 
 
Fishery
Scientific observers onboard longline tuna vessel continued collecting data from the Indian Ocean (two fishing vessels, total 122 days)
August 2013
PT Intimas Surya and Research Institute for Tuna Fisheries
Letter of duty issued by the Research Institute
 
Catch Data Report from Observer Onboard
 
 
 
FIP participants and ATLI faciliated a meeting between ATLI members and Head of Subdirectorate of Monitoring and Evaluation, Directorate General of Capture Fisheries at MMAF to discuss the implementation of logbook and observer onboard programs
February 2014
PT Intimas Surya and ATLI
Presentation from MMAF
 
 
Fishery
MMAF reviewed catch reporting system and provided recommendation for data recording improvements
February 2014
PT Intimas Surya
Note on the agreement for logbook submission improvement
 
 
Fishery
FIP presented progress, lessons learned, and next steps during the Seafood Expo North America in Boston
March 2014
PT Intimas Surya
Power point presentation
FIP is delivering improvement in policies or practices (Stage 4)
Fisheries policy changed
Fishery
Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries established Ministerial Regulation regarding Implementation of Observers on Fishing Boats and Collecting Boats (Permen No.1/PERMEN-KP/2013)
February 2013
Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries
 
 
The fishery management system is more precautionary
 
Stock
IOTC adoption of interim target and limit reference points for major species
 
May 2013
IOTC