NAVIGATION

Last Update: August 2016

Indonesia’s territorial waters adjoin both the Indian Ocean and the Western Central Pacific Ocean, two of the world’s most important fishing grounds for tuna and other large pelagic fish. Consequently, Indonesia is one of the most important producers of tuna and large pelagic fish in the world. 

However, the fisheries face some major challenges including:

  • Inaccurate, incomplete, and inconsistent catch data reporting for larger vessels
  • A lack of data for the artisanal tuna fisheries (the current available annual catch data of tuna fisheries from Indonesia is collected only from larger vessels)
  • A lack of detail in existing catch data that does not identify the catch for each species per gear type
  • Limited or unavailable data for retained catch and bycatch 

Several fishery improvement projects (FIPs) have been established by the industry and supported by NGOs. These FIPs vary in approach, the stakeholders involved, geographical scope, and fisheries covered. However, each FIP aims to improve their respective fisheries by addressing the challenges noted above.  

The Indonesia Tuna and Large Pelagics Supply Chain Roundtable provides a platform to discuss matters of common interest and identify fisheries where improvements are required. The roundtable also catalyzes FIPs, monitors progress and supports FIP creation and implementation.

Supply Chain Roundtable Participants:

North Atlantic

Hilo Fish

Anova Seafood

Cannon Fish

Seafood Exchange

Amacore

Open Seas

Orca Bay

Sea Delight

Lusamerica

Direct Ocean  

Fisheries and/or FIPs Covered:

The roundtable focuses on Indonesian longline and handline fisheries in the Indonesian EEZ, Indian Ocean and Western Central Pacific Ocean.

The following FIPs are supported and monitored:

Longline Indian Ocean Tuna and Large Pelagics FIP, PT. Intimas Surya

Indonesia Tuna FIP, WWF

Indonesia Handline Tuna FIP, ANOVA/MDPI

Indonesia Pole and Line and Handline Tuna FIP, IPNLF/AP2HI

Handline Yellowfin Tuna Banda Sea FIP, PT. Intimas Surya

Longline Tuna and Large Pelagics FIP (Indian Ocean), PT. Tuna Permata Marindo Jaya

Handline Yellowfin Tuna in South Java FIP, Sea Delight

For more details on the sustainability status of the fisheries, progress of the FIPs, and improvement recommendations, please follow this link.

Improvement Needs and Recommendations:

Improvement Needs:

1.     Strengthen and improve catch data reporting from both artisanal and industrial tuna fisheries to support implementation of national tuna management plan.

2.     Government of Indonesia should comply with conservation and management measures (CMMs) of regional fishery management organizations (RFMOs) (IOTC, WCPFC, CCSBT, and IATTC), including adoption of precautionary and ecosystem-based management measures (including biological reference points, harvest control rules, and increased observer coverage for longline fleets).

3.     Support the implementation of the national and regional observer program on vessels >30 GT, and measures aimed at both target and incidental market species as well as non-market species, including ecologically related species (ERS), and all other mandated obligations. 

The SR prioritizes the following fisheries for the initiation and expansion of FIPs: 

1.     Handline yellowfin tuna in North Sulawesi (Western and Central Pacific Ocean)

2.     More participation on Indonesia longline yellowfin tuna and large pelagic species in the Indian Ocean

Find the full list of fisheries in need of improvements overseen by the roundtable here.

Recommendations: 

1.     Urge the Indonesian Government to comply with conservation and management measures (CMMs) of regional fishery management organizations (RFMOs)(IOTC, WCPFC, CCSBT, and IATTC*) including adoption of precautionary and ecosystem-based management measures (including biological reference points, harvest control rules, and increased observer coverage for longline fleets).

2.     Strengthen and improve catch data collection system to ensure complete and timely submission of data sets (i.e., catches, effort, size) through better logbook submission to provide annual catch estimates by gear type and species in the archipelagic waters, territorial waters, and high seas needed for robust stock assessment to the IOTC, CCSBT, and WCPFC.*

3.     Urge the government to coordinate some industries’ initiative to carry out fishery-dependent data collection for small-scale fisheries.

4.     Support the government to implement the National Fisheries Management Plan measures (e.g., data collection, onboard observers, port state measures, transshipment within the territorial waters).


5.     Supply chain to initiate or participate in a fishery improvement project (FIP) and to publicly report the progress of the FIP regularly.

Current Objectives for 2016: 

1.    Expand scale and participation of the FIPs (2 new FIPs established).

2.    Monitor progress and support the successful implementation of FIPs, with all FIPs rated A–C.

3.    At least 20 more boats involved in Observer Onboard program and improvement in logbook submission.

Progress Update: 

2015

January – March

March: SFP hosted an Indonesian Fisheries SR meeting, in Boston, Massachusetts, with the purposes of introducing buyers to the Supply Chain Roundtable in Indonesia; getting an update from the Indonesian industries who are implementing FIPs; and gathering support from buyers to help catalyze and move FIPs forward via the Supply Chain Roundtables. At least 50 people attended the meeting, including retailers, 1st-tier suppliers (about 18 companies), and Indonesian processors/exporters (at least 10 companies). Three 1st-tier suppliers expressed interested in participating in the Indonesia Tuna and Large Pelagics SR after the meeting was held.

April – June

April:  SFP collaborated with IPNLF (International Pole and Line Foundation) to jointly host the Indonesian Fisheries gathering during the Seafood Expo Global in Brussels. SFP CEO Jim Cannon talked briefly about the Indonesian Tuna and Large Pelagics Supply Chain Roundtable, and FIP implementer Intimas Surya presented their progress and challenges implementing their respective FIPs in Indonesia. As a result of the gathering, one French 1st-tier supplier joined the Indonesia SR. During the Brussels expo, several meetings were also held with buyers of Indonesian tuna and large pelagics that come from the FIPs, including Direct Ocean, Sodexo, Quirch, and Kyokuyo.

April: SFP continued to encourage cooperation between Indonesian industry and government in implementation of the National Observer Program on vessels >30 GT.  FIP implementer PT. Tuna Permata Rezeki and the Indonesia Tuna Research Institute (Loka Tuna Benoa) signed an MOU to strengthen collaboration with the scientific observer program onboard FIP vessels.

May:  Indonesia-based companies were seeking information on developing FIPs, as requested from their buyers, who are the participants of the SR.  These companies included: PT. Sari Tuna Makmur (handline tuna in Bitung, North Sulawesi), Hatindo (handline tuna in East Java), and PT. Giovanni Makmur (handline tuna in Lesser Sunda and East Java). In addition, PT. Kemilau Bintang Timur (KBT) requested development of a mahi-mahi FIP, as requested by their buyers.

SFP participated in a series of workshops to develop an Indonesian Harvest Strategy for Tuna Fishery hosted by the Indonesian government (Directorate of Fishery Resource/SDI, DG Capture Fishery, MMAF), where industry-led FIPs contributed with industry production data. Data collected from the FIPs will be continuously used to support the development of a harvest strategy for tuna from the Archipelagic Waters, Fishery Management Area 714, which covers Banda Sea.  SFP has been actively involved, together with IPNLF, MDPI, Greenpeace Indonesia, and WWF Indonesia, in supporting the MMAF to establish a harvest strategy (Harvest Control Rule) for Fishery Management Areas 713 (Makassar Strait, Bone Bay, Flores Sea, and Bali Sea), 714 (Banda Sea), and 715 (Tomini Bay, Maluku, Halmahera, and Ceram Sea).

May:  SFP presented the Indonesia Tuna and Large Pelagics Supply Chain Roundtable initiative at the 4th International Coastal Tuna Business Forum in Bali. The meeting was hosted by IPNLF, MMAF, and AP2HI (Indonesia Pole and Line and Handline Association).

June: Participants in the Indonesia Tuna and Large Pelagics SR visited the Banda handline tuna FIP together with Fair Trade (FT) US to explore the potential development of FT US in Banda. During the 5-day field trip, participants observed handline tuna fishery operations, including discussions with captains, crews, and fishers on the current situation and data collection. FT US and SR participants have had some follow-up discussions, but there is no confirmed commitment and interest yet from the buyers toward the Fair Trade products.

July – September

July: The FIP for Indonesian tuna and large pelagics in the Indian Ocean has expanded as PT. Tuna Permata Rezeki launched their own FIP at the request of the SR participants.

July: SFP continued coordinating with government regarding some industries’ initiative to carry out fishery-dependent data collection for small-scale fisheries.

SFP met with the Director and some scientists from P4KSI (Research Center for Fishery Resources and Conservation) to discuss the data collected from the Handline Yellowfin Tuna Banda Sea FIP and how the FIP can contribute to improve the catch data and monitor the fishing ground.

October – December

November: On November 12, a meeting was held in Jakarta to discuss the Ministerial Decree No. 4 (issued in January 2015) concerning the prohibition of fishing activities in Fishery Management Area number 714 (which include the Banda Sea) from October to December. The outcome of the meeting was the conclusion that the Banda traditional handline tuna fishers are exempted from this Decree, as they are operating boats below 5 GT.

The observer onboard program has been slowed down by the agreement among members of ATLI (Indonesian Longline Tuna Association) (of which PT. Intimas is a member) that until the transshipment regulation is lifted by the Government of Indonesia (MMAF), members of ATLI will not accept onboard observers. SFP provide guidance to FIPs to lift the barrier from having obsever onboard. Three observers onboard FIP vessels and one FIP vessel participated in a trial using Closed-Circuit Television to monitor the activities onboard a supporting vessel, where tuna catch was transported from fishing vessels to the supporting vessel.

2015: Annual Executive Summary

1. Two new FIPs were established:

  1. Handline Yellowfin Tuna Banda Sea FIP led by PT. Intimas Surya 
  2. Longline Tuna and Large Pelagics FIP (Indian Ocean) FIP led by PT. Tuna Permata Rezeki

2. The existing FIPs have been supported by the SR in implementation of their workplans and 6 out of 7 FIPs have achieved FIP progress ratings in the range A–C. 

3. The observer onboard program has been slowed down by the agreement among members of ATLI (Indonesian Longline Tuna Association) that, until the transshipment regulation is lifted by the Government of Indonesia (MMAF), members of ATLI will not accept onboard observers. SFP provided guidance to FIPs to lift the barrier from having observers onboard. Three observers have been onboard FIP vessels in 2015.

2016 

January – March 

The Indonesia Tuna and Large Pelagic SR meeting was held on March 7,  2016, in Boston (during Seafood Expo for North America:  The SR discussed and agreed roles of SR participants, reviewed status of the fisheries and FIPs and SR workplan for 2016, and discussed and agreed actions recommended for participants. See meeting report, presentation, and supporting documents

April – June 

SR participants noted the potential for shark finning in their supply chain and initiated a conversation with the catchers to develop a shark finning policy onboard FIP vessels. 

SR participants attended the Bali Tuna Conference May 2016 and International Coastal Business Forum in Bali and encouraged attending producers to seek guidance from SFP on FIP initiation. 

SFP presented the improvement activities on the catch data of the handline YFT Banda Sea FIP, led by Intimas Surya, at the 7th Indonesian Annual Catch Estimate for the WCPFC Area in June 2016.

July – August

SR participants attended the regional FIP implementers workshop in Bali to discuss FIP financing, securing goverment support, and the assessing the FIP effectiveness. 

Planned SR Meetings and Events: 

An Indonesia Tuna and Large Pelagics SR meeting in Jakarta is provisionally planned for November/December 2016, following the Regional MSC Stakeholder Council Meeting in early November in Bali.

Conference calls and progress updates to SR participants are conducted regularly. 

Project Contact: 

If you would like more information about the Supply Chain Roundtable or wish to support it, please contact SFP.

* Note - Definitions for RFMO acronyms: 

IOTC:         Indian Ocean Tuna Commission

WCPFC:     Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission

CCSBT:       Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna

IATTC:       Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission

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